Wilsons Promontory National Park

I don’t blog about every weekend getaway around my home state of Victoria, but as a first post-lockdown trip beyond the boundaries of Melbourne this was quite special.

We actually planned this trip back in early July, before the COVID-19 outbreak put us through the three miserable months of hard lockdown. Previously, I’ve only been to Wilsons Prom once many years ago. My most vivid memory from that trip was crossing paths with an adorable, chubby-cheeked and completely blasé wombat while out on a walk. Sadly we didn’t see any wombats this time around, but we still had a local wildlife encounter in the shape of a decent-sized snake that slithered across the path just in front of us. We didn’t get to find out if it was venomous.

We didn’t stay overnight in the park itself, and instead found accommodation about an hour away. On our way, we swung past Phillip Island where holidaying seemed to be back to its normal levels, though everyone still diligently wore face masks. As always, we had a stroll along the Nobbies boardwalks. This area is always incredibly picturesque, but this time it was even more so with the scatterings of pink and yellow flowers.

Next morning, we drove down to Wilsons Prom and did a 3-hour walk from the Tidal River campground. Though the grounds themselves are mighty cramped and devoid of any romance, spending a day out on the nearby beach where the river joins the ocean looked inviting.

Within minutes, I was already regretting that I was too lazy to bring my proper SLR camera. I completely forgot how stunning this park is.

It was a full-on couple of days, but it was so nice to be out on the road and travelling again. Fingers crossed, our current state of infection rates holds and maybe we can progress to *gasp* an interstate trip some time next year.

3 comments

  1. We used to spend easter here every year in a tent, back in the old days (close to 60 years ago). I doubt it looks anything like it did back then, but the highlight was the outdoor picture theatre. And the walking tracks.

    Liked by 1 person

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